As Traxxas announced they will be venturing into the Crawler Market, some people had doubts whilst others believed in the long experience Traxxas had with offroad vehicles. Here we will be comparing what can be described as a milestone in the Crawler world: Axial‘s SCX-10 II. Since newcomers coming into the hobby will be looking at getting the built (RTR) versions, we will be comparing the TRX-4 to the RTR version of the Axial SCX10 II.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Here we have a side to side view of both, in the comparison Traxxas’s TRX-4 will be on the left hand side.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Here we can see the details of the front of the body, both bodies are Lexan which keeps the weight down but may sacrifice scale looks. As you can see here, there are many more molded plastic parts on the Traxxas which may appeal to some people.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

A view of the two bodies from the top you can see here included with the Traxxas crawler is a roof rack and slightly more plastic detail parts.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

If we look at the back of both crawlers, again we can see more detail molded plastic accessories come with the Traxxas, but strangely enough there is no drop hitch mount on Traxxas’s rear bumper.

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Starting to compare both chassis, with the Traxxas still on the left. Here you can see both cars uses four links in the back, however in the front of both rigs there are only three links.

Both use a diff cover type axle which allows for easy access to the diffs if you wish so to take the diff out for maintenance.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Here we compare the battery mounting systems on both rigs. Both feature a quick release however on the Traxxas (Bottom Photo) it seems that Traxxas’s solution looks better with molded plastic parts. A nice touch was the flip battery plate with both sides for use with different thickness of batteries.

In the Axial SCX10 II, you can see it will be easier to use a thicker battery as the tray has already allowed for room for thicker batteries, if you are using a 2s battery, it would be recommended to add foam to the sides to prevent the battery from sliding around.

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Here we can see the steering angle between the TRX-4 and SCX10 II, not much difference here. But we can see because on the TRX-4 the servo is mounted perpendicular to the chassis there is room to fit the gearbox and motor at the front which brings more front over the front wheels which the general consensus is that it provides a better crawling rig.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Comparing the shocks that are included in both rigs, the Traxxas comes with aluminum shocks whereas Axial packages their trustworthy plastic shocks. Whilst on the track both might perform the same, seeing aluminum bits on your rig just feels more pleasing to the eyes.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Comparing escs, both come with waterproof brushed ESCs capable of running the highest torque motors without breaking a sweat. No surprises that Traxxas have included their own battery plug with their ESC where Axial have stepped up and included a deans style type of plug which can be said one of the most common power plugs to date.

traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison traxxas trx-4 vs axial scx10 II comparison

Comparing the drivetrain, Traxxas comes bundled with a two-speed transmission gearbox configuration which is controlled by tiny servos and actuated through switches on the transmitter. The Traxxas comes with a beefier 550 class sized motor which will provide more torque when compared to a 540 size of the same turns.

On Axial’s side it is their bombproof AX10 gear box with a slipper clutch to prevent damage to the drivetrain. There is an option of adding a two-speed through various option parts by Axial or other aftermarket manufacturers.

And that wraps up our comparison, whilst the Traxxas TRX-4 may seem to have more features on paper but it’s MSRP of $479USD is higher than that of Axial’s SCX10 II RTR price of $409USD and the increased diffculty to newcomers of adjusting different functions on the transmitter makes the TRX-4 targeted more to a middle class rather than the newcomer’s that Axial have targeted.